Finding Your Super-Courage

There was a time when I was “Faster than a speeding bullet, more powerful than a locomotive, able to leap tall buildings in a single bound!”  If you are younger than 50 you may not recognize this statement but it was one that began the weekly TV show of Superman, who became my hero…even my wishful identity.  I remember laying awake as long as I could in bed at night so I could daydream, something I did a lot, about flying onto the playground at my elementary school to rescue someone being bullied and then flying off as everyone wondered who I was.  Yes, I know there is a lot of diagnosing that can be done about me from those early years but you can do that later.  Laurie, my wife, laughs that many of my dreams are still about rescuing someone from peril. Anyway, there is a point to all this.  When I tied one of my mom’s scarves around my neck I could fly and I could do just about anything.  In those moments of play, I was not limited to the regular abilities of Bill Lokey; anything was possible.

So I am wondering if you could have 30 minutes of superpower available to you, what would you do?  What would you overcome?  What might you defeat?  What might you set right?  Would you spend it on something small or would you go after something colossal?

Okay, so what if it was not a superpower you could have for 30 minutes but just super-courage.  What would you do if in the next year you had 30 minutes of uncharacteristic courage?  What decision might you make that you have been avoiding?  What amends might you make?  What loving act might you take?  Who might you call or talk to?  What gift of creativity might you give the world?  What gift might you give yourself?  You and I get stuck in what we always have done while we wish for “someday” when I might do something different.  What if today or this week you could have 30 minutes of courage when you step through all the fear to do or say something that might make a difference in your life?  When you know what it is you want to do, put on the cape and fly.

Bill Lokey

Chief Clinical Officer